The upcoming U.S. midterm elections are bringing minimum wage and equal pay regulations to the ballot in many states across the country. The gender pay gap has narrowed over the last fifty years when the Equal Pay Act was signed it law but inequality still exists. According to research from the Pew Research Center, in 2017 women earned 82 percent of what men earned in the United States. The 2017 gender pay gap was smaller for Millennial workers, compared to older workers.

The gender pay gap may exist, but perception is everything. At Branded, we were curious how our users – both men and women- feel about their household income level. Do they feel they are paid appropriately for the work they do? Do they think they are underpaid? Or overpaid? We conducted a poll on September 6, 2018, to find out and 16,824 users responded.

Overall, 66 percent of our working users say they are underpaid, 31 percent of our working users say they are paid about right and 3 percent of working users say they are overpaid.

Not surprisingly, our research found that working men are more comfortable with their household income level than women. Approximately 33 percent of working men say they are paid about right compared to 28 percent of women.

While older users are more likely to feel they are paid appropriately than younger users, men are more likely to feel comfortable with their household income than women across the generations.

Among the Silent Generation (age 70+), 56 percent of working men say they are paid about right compared to 49 percent of women. Within the Baby Boomer generation (age 51-69), 35 percent of working men say they are paid about right compared to 31 percent of working women. For Gen X (age 39-50), 31 percent of working men say they are paid appropriately compared to 24 percent of women. And among Millennials (age 22-38), 32 percent of working men say they are paid about right, compared to 28 percent of working women.

% Who Say They Are Paid Appropriately by Generation and Gender