Airline and hotel loyalty and rewards programs are tremendously popular among travelers. Airline loyalty programs boast 288 million active members worldwide earning about 3.5 trillion points per year. While hotel reward programs have more than 350 million active members globally.

At Branded, we were curious if our users belong to loyalty or rewards programs for their favorite airline and hotels. We conducted a poll to ask our community on September 29, 2018, and 16,058 users responded.

Overall, 33 percent of our users reported that they belong to a rewards program for their favorite airline. Our poll found that upscale consumers with household income of $100,000 plus are much more likely to belong to airline reward programs than those with lower household income. Approximately 56 percent of those with a household income of $100,000 plus belong to airline rewards programs, compared to 28 percent of those with household income less than $100,000. Higher household income not only signals more discretionary income for leisure travel but also increased business travel.

Among upscale consumers with household income of $100,000 plus, older consumers are more likely than younger consumers to belong to airline rewards programs. Roughly 67 percent of upscale Silent Generation consumers (age 70+) belong to airline rewards programs versus 57 percent of upscale Baby Boomers (age 51-69), 55 percent of upscale Gen X (age 39-50) and 56 percent of upscale Millennials (age 22-38).

Looking at hotel rewards programs, our poll found that overall 29 percent of users say they belong to a hotel rewards program. Similar to airline rewards programs, we found that upscale consumers with household income in excess of $100,000 are more likely than those with lower household income to belong to hotel rewards programs. Approximately 52 percent of those with a household income of $100,000 plus belong to hotel rewards programs, compared to 28 percent of those with household income less than $100,000.   

Just as we saw with airline rewards programs, we find that older consumers are more likely than younger consumers to belong to hotel rewards programs. About 62 percent of upscale Silent Generation consumers report belonging to a hotel rewards program, compared to 55 percent of upscale Baby Boomers, 53 percent of upscale Gen X and 50 percent of upscale Millennials.