Asking questions is a foundational component of research. At Branded, we interact with our users on a daily basis, gathering insights by asking them the questions that are most important to our clients. We were curious about how our users feel about being on the other side of the question/answer paradigm. How do users feel about asking questions in their everyday lives? Are they concerned about asking their friends and family questions that may be deemed stupid? Or do they feel comfortable asking questions when interacting with those closest to them?

We conducted a poll of our users to ask if they feel concerned asking questions that they deem stupid when talking to their friends and family. Our poll was conducted on September 20, 2018, and 16,982 users responded.

Overall, our research found that 39 percent of users feel concerned about asking their friends and family stupid questions while 61 percent say they do not feel concerned about asking stupid questions to friends and family.

When evaluating the poll results by generation, we find that younger users are more likely than older users to feel concerned about asking potentially stupid questions when talking with their friends and family. Approximately 52 percent of Gen Z (age 13-21) and 45 percent of Millennials (age 22-38) say they feel concerned about asking dumb questions, compared to 38 percent of Gen X (age 39-50), 31 percent of Baby Boomers (age 51-69) and 26 percent of the Silent Generation (age 70+).

Our poll also found that Asian consumers are more likely than any other racial and ethnic group to say they feel concerned about asking stupid questions of their friends and family. Approximately 48 percent of Asian users feel worried to ask stupid questions, compared to 44 percent of Hispanic users, 36 percent of Caucasian users and 34 percent of African American users.

Overall, women are slightly more likely than men to say they feel some level of concern about asking stupid questions of their loved ones. Approximately 40 percent of women feel this concerned compared to 37 percent of men. For the most part, that trend holds true across racial and ethnic groups with one key exception. African American men are slightly more likely than African American women to say they feel concerned about asking their friends and family stupid questions.

% Who Feel Concerned Asking Stupid Questions to Friends/Family by Race and Gender