In our last post, we began our evaluation of the worker ‘job hopping’ trend by evaluating users who have quit a job at some point in their careers. Workers are changing jobs much more frequently than in the past and most users have quit a job at some point in their careers. We wanted to better understand the types of workers who quit jobs compared to those who are fired. Our research found that Baby Boomers and Gen X were most likely to have quit a job, especially the college-educated members of these generations.  

Now, we are moving on to examine the types of users who are most likely to have been fired from a job during the course of their career. We polled our community on June 1, 2018 to ask users if they have ever been fired and 15,768 users responded.

Overall, workers are more likely to have left jobs voluntarily than non-voluntarily. One-third of our users have been fired from a position during their career. Digging deeper, we observed pronounced differences in the data by generation, gender, and household income.

Baby Boomers (age 51-69) and Gen X (age 39-50) are most likely to have been fired from a job. We also found that these generations were most likely to have quit a job, indicating significant job hopping whether voluntary or not. Approximately 39 percent of Baby Boomers and 36 percent of Gen X have been fired, compared to 34 percent of the Silent Generation (age 70+) and 28 percent of Millennials (age 22-38).

% Who Say They Have Been Fired

 

Our research also found that men are more likely than women to have been fired from a job. About 38 percent of men have been fired during the course of their career compared to 28 percent of women.

Users with lower income (HHI less than $75k) are also more likely to say they have been fired when compared to upper-income users (HHI $75k+). Roughly 35 percent of lower income users have been fired versus 28 percent of upper-income.