Jobs, Jobs, Jobs. We have heard this slogan chanted since the 2016 presidential election season. But it’s more than just a slogan. Job loss and replacement have been a reality in the U.S. for decades. However, the root cause of job replacement and job loss is much debated. Some think trade policies are the blame. Other cite increased immigration. And others view technology and automation as the cause.

At Branded, we were curious how many of our community members are concerned about job loss due to automation. And is concern about job loss to automation greater among certain segments of the population? We polled our community and  17,142  community members responded.

Our research found distinct patterns of concern about job loss to automation that align with key voting blocks in the 2016 election. Segments of the population who favored Hillary Clinton like Millennials, multiculturals and the highly educated as well as those living in states that voted for Clinton in the 2016 presidential election are most likely to indicate they are very concerned about job replacement to robots or automation in the next 10 years.

Younger workers in the Millennial generation are 44 percent more likely than the average worker to indicate they are concerned their jobs will be replaced by robots or automation in the next 10 years.

Multicultural workers are more concerned about job replacement from automation than Caucasian workers. Asian workers are most likely to be concerned, with 24 percent citing concern, followed by Hispanic workers at 18 percent and African American workers at 17 percent. Only 7 percent of Caucasian workers indicate they are concerned about job replacement from automation or robots.

Geographic patterns of automation fear align with voting patterns in the 2016 election as well. With the exception of Utah, the top states with community members concerned about losing their jobs to automation voted for Hillary Clinton in the 2016 election. Job loss was a major theme of Donald Trump’s campaign. However the focus was on job loss due to immigration and trade rather than automation.

Top 5 States for Fear of Automation

    1. New York: 31%
    2. Rhode Island: 29%
    3. Connecticut: 18%
    4. California: 17%
    5. Utah: 16%

Higher income workers (those with household income of $100,000+) are the more likely to be concerned about automation than workers with lower incomes. Higher income workers are 33 percent more likely than the average workers to indicate they are concerned their jobs will be replaced by automation in the next 10 years.