Americans now spend more at restaurants and bars than they do on groceries. In 2016, U.S. consumers spent $54.86 billion at restaurants and bars, compared with $52.51 billion at grocery stores. Spending on both restaurants and groceries has been growing, but restaurants spending has grown at a faster rate. The rise of quick service restaurants, in particular, that cost more than fast food are responsible for increasing restaurant spend. On the other hand, grocery stores have emphasized bargains to draw shoppers.

At Branded, we were curious how often our community members cook at home. And who is driving the shift from eating at home to dining out? We polled our community and 14,143 members responded.

Overall, the majority of our community (55 percent) cooks at home on a daily basis, with an additional 32 percent cooking at home a couple times a week.

Digging deeper, we found older generations are much more likely to cook at home every day than younger generations. Among Baby Boomers (age 51-69), 62 percent cook at home every day and an additional 29 percent cook several times a week. The older Silent Generation (age 70+) is even more likely to cook at home with 63 percent indicating they cook at home every day and 24 percent cook a couple times a week. Many of these older consumers are likely to be retired and spend most of their time at home.

Millennials are less likely than older generations to cook at home with 49 percent indicating they cook every day. However, 37 percent cook at home several times a week. Younger consumers are on the go and tend to lead less structured lifestyles than older generations.

Gen X, at the peak of their parenting years, fall between the younger and older generations with 58 percent indicating they cook every day and 32 percent indicating they cook at home a couple times a week.

As spending on restaurant dining continues to rise, understanding these generational dining trends is vital.

Frequency of Cooking at Home by Generation