From Donald Trump to Cynthia Nixon and from Arnold Schwarzenegger to Jesse Ventura, a wide range of celebrities have jumped into the U.S. political arena. Some celebrities have seen great success as politicians while others have struggled.

At Branded, we were curious how the public perceives celebrity politicians. Do consumers generally think celebrities can find success in politics? Or do they think celebrities should stick to the entertainment industry?  We polled our community on April 26, 2018 and 9,240 U.S. users responded.

We hypothesized that those living in states that went Red in the 2016 presidential election and voted for Donald Trump would be more likely to support celebrity politicians than those living in states that went Blue in 2016.

However, our research found that those living in states that went Blue in the 2016 presidential election were slightly more likely than those living in Red states to support celebrity politicians. Roughly 56 percent of those living in Blue states from the 2016 presidential election say celebrities can be successful politicians versus 53 percent of those living in Red states.

And in New York state, home to both Donald Trump and Cynthia Nixon, 66 percent of residents say celebrities can be successful politicians.

Looking at the data by generation also reveals some interesting trends. In the 2016 presidential election, Millennials (age 22-38) were more likely to favor Hillary Clinton and Baby Boomers (age 51-69) were more likely to favor Donald Trump. Prior to analyzing the data we assumed that Millennials would frown upon celebrity politicians. However, the results revealed a different story.   

A majority of Millennials, Gen X and Baby Boomers say celebrities can be successful politicians. Gen X (age 39-50) are more likely than any other generation to say celebrities can find success in politics. Roughly 59 percent of Gen X, followed by 54 percent of Baby Boomers and 53 percent of Millennials. The older Silent Generation (age 70+) was least likely to say celebrities find success as politicians at 45 percent.