New research from MONEY evaluated the quality of life in 583 major communities across the U.S. to determine their list of the best places to live. Crime, household income, cost of living, education, amenities, and diversity were all key to determining the quality of life in a community.  Frisco, Texas; Ashburn, Virginia; Carmel, Indiana; Ellicott City, Maryland; and Cary, North Carolina top the list of best communities in the U.S.

At Branded, we were curious how our community members feel about life in their communities. Do our users think the quality of life in their neighborhood is better or worse than other neighborhoods across the country? We conducted a poll of our community and asked our users how they feel quality of life in their communities compares to other neighborhoods. Our poll was conducted on September 8, 2018, and 15,689 users responded.

Overall, 28 percent of our users feel that quality of life in their community is better than other neighborhoods, while 61 percent feel they live in an average community and 11 percent say the quality of life in their community is worse than other neighborhoods.

Quality of Life in Community Compared to Other Neighborhoods

 

Level of education and household income often dictate where consumers live. And our research revealed interesting trends by both level of education and household income. Looking at our users by level of education, 19 percent of those with a high school education say the quality of life in their community is better than other neighborhoods, compared to 24 percent of those with some college education and 37 percent of those with a college education or higher.

Among those with a college education or higher, older users have stronger positive feelings about their communities than younger users. Roughly 53 percent of the Silent Generation (age 70+), 41 percent of Baby Boomers (age 51-69), 37 percent of Gen X (age 39-50) and 33 percent of Millennials (age 22-38) feel the quality of life in their communities is better than average.

Similarly, those with higher levels of household income tend to feel better about their neighborhoods than those with lower household income levels. Among those with household income over $75,000, 43 percent of users say they feel quality of life in their communities is above average. While only 23 percent of those with household income less than $75,000 feel quality of life in their communities is better than other neighborhoods.

Among those with high household income above $75,000, 55 percent of the Silent Generation, 48 percent of Baby Boomers, 41 percent of Gen X and 39 percent of Millennials say the quality of life in their communities is better than average.