Does anyone still use their phones to make voice calls? Or has texting completely taken over smartphone communication? Approximately 19 billion texts are sent every day compared to about 12 billion voice calls made per day. And two-thirds of consumers indicate they prefer texting over voice calls. These important changes in communications preference matter – whether it is a parent trying to get in touch with her child, coworkers interacting or a marketer trying to capture the attention of their audience.  

At Branded we were curious if our users still use voice calling and answer their phones. And if so, we wanted to know if some users are more likely than others to answer the phone. We polled our community on June 11, 2018, and 16,448 users responded.  

Overall, 1 in 4 users (24 percent) say they always pick up their phone when receiving voice calls. And an additional 59 percent of users say they sometimes pick up the phone. Roughly 14 percent of users rarely pick up their phones and 3 percent of users never pick up the phone. So, what type of consumer audience is most likely to answer the phone?  

Our research found that men are more likely than women to say they always pick up their phones. Approximately 29 percent of men say they always pick up their phones compared to 20 percent of women.

Not surprisingly, older users are more likely than younger users to use voice calling and say they always pick up their phones. About 36 percent of Silent Generations users (age 70+) always pick up their phones compared to 26 percent of Baby Boomers (age 51-69), 21 percent of Gen X (age 39-50) and 23 percent of Millennials (age 22-38).

We also observed distinctions by race and ethnicity. Asian users are most likely to say they always pick up their phones. Roughly 27 percent of Asian users always answer the phone, followed by 23 percent of African Americans, 22 percent of Hispanics and 20 percent of Caucasians.