With the start of 2019 just over two weeks away, consumers are reflecting on 2018 and making plans for 2019. At Branded, we were curious if setting New Year’s resolutions is part of our user’s plans for the remainder of the year. And do our users think that setting New Year’s resolutions is an effective way of breaking a bad habit?

We conducted a survey to find out more. Our poll on New Year’s resolutions was conducted on December 7, 2018, and 13,613 users responded.  

Overall our poll found that 1 in 4 users are planning to set a New Year’s resolution for 2019 and an additional 33 percent told us they might make a resolution but they have not decided yet.

Our research found that younger consumers are more likely than older consumers to say they intend to make a New Year’s resolution. Approximately 30 percent of Millennials (age 22-38) are planning to set a New Year’s resolution, followed by 28 percent of Gen X (age 39-50), 18 percent of Baby Boomers (age 51-69) and 14 percent of the Silent Generation (age 70+).

Among the younger generations, men are more likely than women to set New Year’s resolutions. While older women are more likely than older men to set New Year’s resolutions. About 32 percent of Millennial men and 31 percent of Gen X men plan to make resolutions compared to 29 percent of Millennial women and 25 percent of Gen X women. In contrast, 19 percent of Baby Boomer women and 15 percent of Silent Generation women plan to make resolutions compared to 18 percent of Baby Boomer men and 12 percent of Silent Generation men.  

New Year’s resolutions often center around breaking bad habits whether the focus is smoking or eating healthy or exercising. We also surveyed our users to see if they think New Year’s resolutions are an effective way to break a bad habit.

Our poll found that about 1 in 5 users think resolutions are always an effective way to break a bad habit and an additional 45 percent say resolutions are sometimes an effective way to curb bad habits.

In addition to setting more New Year’s resolutions, the younger generations are also more likely to say that resolutions are a good way to break a bad habit. About 22 percent of Millennials and 20 percent of Gen X say setting resolutions is effective for breaking bad habits, compared to 13 percent of Baby Boomers and 10 percent of the Silent Generation.